17 July 2014

Cleaver Magazine: a second review of Imago

Poetry reviewer Kenna O'Rourke wrote up a really great review of my chapbook Imago for Cleaver Magazine! So exciting! Here are some of my favorite bits: 

"Even if one were to dismiss the conceit of Imago (or interpret it more literally), the chapbook would resonate courtesy of the very elegance of the lines within. Refreshingly sparse and thoughtfully arranged, Lusby's language is what transmutes absurdity into emotion here…"


"Sense is abandoned for the sensory; logic abandoned for mystery. In other words, by Lusby's strange machinations, a reader can't help but look at vegetables a bit differently for a spell."

Thank you so much for your generous words, Kenna! Read the full review here.


P.S.
The Cleaver Magazine Twitter account referred to it as "eggplant-fantasia." And I think I like it. Hah!

11 July 2014

Manifesto of a feminist, in brief

**This typically has not been a space in which I air my political views. I try to stay on the topic of poetry, printing, and books. But there are some things I need to say that are central to who I am on the subject of feminism that have steadily bothered me more and more and more. Today, I've reached a breaking point. These are things that seep into every part of my life including the obsessions listed above. Bear with me for this one post, please.**

FIRST OF ALL: I am a proud feminist. 

HOWEVER, from the beginning there has been this ugly underbelly that at some point was given a name: White Feminism. KEEP READING. This is not a name for feminists who are also white. This is a dangerously clueless movement polluting the greater, beautiful cause. That only understands feminism through the lens of the middle-class white woman. This lens has no capability for peripheral vision and, so, the White Feminist cannot understand why women of color still have issues regarding race and class and prejudice and discrimination, or why all of these issues are inextricably interconnected with feminism. White Feminists' propensity to approach all issues of race with defensiveness automatically shuts down further conversation, and the issue dies in stubborn discord and divisiveness. They create a brick wall down the middle of feminism and put everything that makes them uncomfortable about inherited privileges on the other side. 

SURE, the feminist who is white faces issues of sexism, just like our feminists of color. But we white girls DO have privilege of race. Acknowledging that privilege does not denigrate the legitimacy of your feminism. So stop running away from it. It will make you uncomfortable, sure, but you're a woman which means you're incredibly strongso suck it up. When you do face up to your own privilege, it will open you up in a way that allows you to listen to an experience that is not your own and learn from it. Listening and learning from mistakes makes you a better person and a better feminist. None of us are saying that being born white makes you a bad person, so please stop crying victim, White Feminists. You are not being attacked. You are being asked to stop talking for a minute and listen. And then, take a few minutes to absorb and reflect. Reflect on yourself and be honest. Have empathy. You don't have to respond right away. And remember: granting legitimacy to the experiences of another person does not de-value your own. That's not what this is about.

THE THING IS: As feminists, I feel we have a responsibility to respect the legitimate differences in our experiences, as well as the similarities. Feminists who are white should be supporting their (our) fellow feminists of color in bringing issues to the table that affect them in a way that is unique to them. That doesn't create divisiveness within the feminist movement—the refusal to provide that equal respect does.

DO YOU SEE? Equal. Respect. That's all it's ever been about.

**This has been a test of the emergency alert system. We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming**


10 July 2014

Interview: Writers on the Writing Process

Laura E. Davispoet, editor of Weave Magazine, and founder of Submission Bombershas posted an interview with me as part of her series "Writers on the Writing Process" over on her blog Dear Outerspace. My "process" feels so jumbled most of the time that talking about it with her (erwriting about it to her, really) made me feel like there actually may be more of a method to it than I'm able to notice much of the time. I am certainly the kind of creature who finds comfort in habit and routine. Read the full interview here.

And some other little things this week:
  • A copy of my chapbook is hanging in some fine company in Sundress Publications' library at SAFTA, The Wardrobe.
  • That little chapbook of mine also has a listing at Goodreads and LibraryThing, now that I finally took care of some social media housekeeping.
  • And a glowing review (written by Mary Florio) of Fairy Tale Review's Emerald Issue was published on NewPages!

25 June 2014

The Feminist Wire

Today, two new poems of mine were published on The Feminist Wire. "Girl with no Hands" and "Interlude" appeared alongside this very fitting photograph of a tree that looks remarkably like a dancing girl. These two poems are the seeds of a new manuscript project I've been working on for the last year, called Catechesis. And it is growing slowly, but steadily.

I hope you enjoy reading them!

23 June 2014

There are birds here

We are now in the full porch-swing of summer, which means Summer Poetry Salons at my beloved Lit House. In celebration of the second salon of the summer on June 24 (tomorrow!), I was given the unbelievably fun task of designing and printing a letterpress broadside for Jamaal May's poem "There Are Birds Here," a love song for Detroit.



As much I loved this poem on my first reading (and second and third), it was a particularly difficult design challenge. Don't get me wrongthere are so many ways to illustrate this poem because it is so packed with images. But to illustrate it in a way that actually adds to the text, that builds on the complex foundation set down by the poetthat is the challenge to be met. That is the challenge we always aim to meet at the Literary House Press.  

So that means no birds and no buildings. For me, those are the two most obvious, but least important images in this poem. Those details are just the shell around the actual poem. But after playing around with various ideas for a solid hour, the right one finally surfaced: a sidewalk hopscotch game using the poem title for its tiles. The repetition of certain letters made this idea work, the coincidental book-ending of the title with the words "there" and "here." Yellow sidewalk chalk on stone-flecked concrete. It wasn't an image that was explicitly in the poem, but the poem certainly led me to it. And I think it gets at the poem's heart, pulls back the ribs and reveals it a bit more (at least I hope that it does).




09 June 2014

West Chester Poetry Conference, year two

I've just returned from this year's West Chester Poetry Conference, my second time attending. Although I'm still exhausted from the four-day stretch of poetry workshops and panels and readings (and sleeping in dorms), it was a wonderful, unforgettable time. This year's workshop offerings included an opportunity to work with the amazing Mary Jo Salterso, obviously, I jumped at the chance. I've loved Mary Jo since I discovered her 1999 collection A Kiss in Space at my favorite local indie bookstore (The Compleat Bookseller) back in my high school days. I read her poem "Hail in Honfleur" while loitering at the neatly-stocked shelves with the classical radio playing over the shop speakers. I will always remember this poem and how I was immediately charmed by Mary Jo's wit and wordplay, which struck me as perfectly, whimsically French. I wanted to live inside that poem.

Mary Jo Salter's workshop"Line, Sentence, Stanza, Poem"was a much needed refresher in how to make stronger,  more meaningful line and stanza breaks in my poems. We talked about Paul Fussell's Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, that a 3-stanza poem should be a 3-part idea, that the parts should be ordered for emphasis from second most interesting to least interesting to most interesting. We discussed Denise Levertov's idea that stanzas are "distinct units of awareness." We discussed the concept of stanzas as terraces, stepping us up or down or sideways into something else. Mary Jo told us that we should break our lines and stanzas to indicate a poetic turn, that ending lines on weak words like "of" or "in" makes the breaks seem arbitrary, and the poem is weaker for it. Bringing these lessons back to my own writing will help me to be more conscious in my choices when creating the physical shape of a poem on the page and help the content to choose its most perfect form.


02 June 2014

Tori is my diva

Recently, a poet-friend of mine asked me a fun little question that has stuck in my head since that night. Who is your diva? His is Cher. Another poet at the table named Stevie Nicks. I knew mine right away: Tori Amos



I don't know that I could explain exactly what it is about her music, her writing, and her person that make her such an invigorating kind of comfort to me. The haunting piano melodies, the whimsical girl-power lyrics that (even as a writer-snob) I am not ashamed to belt out around the house, her powerful and strange vocals. All I know is when my anxiety demons overpower me--leaving me small, ugly, painfully forgettable, and disconnected from all the things and people I love--Tori can bring me back every time. She fills me when I feel emptied out. She makes me brave and fierce when I can't breathe and my hands are shaking. I can't imagine my world without her in it.

We'll see how brave you are. 
We'll see how fast you'll be running. 
We'll see how brave you are. 
Yes, Anastasia...

P.S. 
In case you were wondering, my favorite albums are Under the Pink and Boys for Pele. Love love love.